Riviera

Expert opinions on the new 43 Open Flybridge with IPS

Riviera has received some very positive feedback following on from the successful world release of the 43 Open Flybridge at the Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show in May. Peter Scott of Go Boating Magazine, Barry Tyler of Pacific MotorYacht Magazine, and David Lockwood from Trade A Boat Magazine had this to say about Riviera’s latest and innovative addition to its award-winning range.

 

“As the first of the build, hull number one delivered in all aspects of liveability and performance,”  - Peter Scott.

“While the Riviera 43 Open Flybridge luxury cruiser was a definite breath of fresh air as regards to design and innovation, it was certainly far from an effort by a bunch of new-age gobbledygook gurus out to inflict change regardless of consequence.  This was a boat designed by a team who know and understand boating in the 21st century.  Every change, every feature, was practical as well as user-friendly – for all the family.  What more could you ask then, of a 14.46-metre flybridge cruiser with all the toys…that cost less than a million dollars to put on the water!”  - Barry Tyler.

“At face value, the designers behind Riviera’s new 43 Open Flybridge appear to have built an evolutionary boat after having consulted their text books titled Hits and Misses and Customer Feedback.  But step aboard and you’ll discover a truly revolutionary cruiser configured to carry Riviera’s steady-as-she-goes offshore flybridge range into the future.  Externally she’s a modernised Riv, but internally she’s something even more refreshing and, yes, inspiring,”  - David Lockwood.

 

PERFORMANCE:

“In terms of economy, at eight knots cruising the 43 Open has a total fuel burn of just 24 litres per hour.  She is on the plane at a touch over 12 knots using just 74 litres per hour at 2300rpm.  At a comfortable planing hull cruising speed of 22 knots, fuel consumption increases to 116 litres per hour at 3050rpm.

“Given the 43 Open’s fuel capacity of 1800 litres with a 10 percent reserve, the new cruiser can comfortably deliver between 350 and 500 nautical mile range, depending on speed,” Peter Scott.

“The engine configuration in this instance was of the pod-drive variety, again breaking new ground for a flybridge model…IPS600 Volvo Penta diesel engines and drive systems and once again the package certainly didn’t disappoint. Confirming the economy factor at a ‘cruise’ speed, our readings showed the 43 actually became more economical the quicker the boat went…the two companies (Riviera and Volvo Penta) again worked closely together and the end result was a hull that accelerated well, went like the proverbial cut cat and it handled the swells well both uphill and downhill.  It turned spectacularly also, with what was a surprisingly level attitude for a boat of this size, at this speed.  What I especially liked though was the actual lack of fuss or sensation.  That to me is the very essence of a good hull, when it does what it should seemingly without your even realising – it was what could be best described as robotically efficient in every aspect,” Barry Tyler.

“The upside of the IPS becomes immediate when I advance the throttles – the acceleration is swift.  But as is wont to happen when you have a camera pointed your way, our sea trials involved some spirited slalom driving that was almost chided.  The thing I like is the fact the natural trim angle sees the boat’s forefoot sit right where it slices the swells without needing to call on the trim tabs.  As such, there were no bad thumps and the boat is pleasantly dry…manoeuvrability was markedly sportier with IPS drives.  At low speed, with the ‘boost’ button depressed, the boat reacted swiftly to a push, tag, or twist on the joytick,” David Lockwood.

FLYBRIDGE:

“Riviera have cleverly addressed the, less than popular, flybridge ladder by designing a new styled stairway which features teak treads and an ergonomically designed vertical rise which makes navigating these stairs much easier than a convention ladder.  The 43 can easily fulfil the role of a traditional flybridge convertible because of its spacious self draining cockit, recessed toe holds in the side coamings for the avid fisherman and a large teak swim platform for watersports.  The open flybridge configuration, while complete with quality clears, forward lounge, dinette, sink and bar amenities, offers much versatility.  The hardtop is mounted on stainless steel supports and a new design concept removes the need to have any supports in the line of vision.  A conventional aft starboard side helm is beautifully configured with an innovative storage compartment, ideal for charts and the like, concealed forward of the dash,” Peter Scott.

“Riviera had done, I feel, a brilliant job too with the ladder access to the flybridge, for a lot of thought and effort had obviously gone into placing it in such a way that it impeded little on cockpit space, yet was still of practical use, whatever the sea conditions.  Just the right rake, the generously-sized teak steps and the integral grab rails – all ensured a safe passage to the next level.  Along with the ‘flybridge’ prerequisite of good visibility to each corner of the vessel, this level featured for the skipper and guests, two Pompanette helm chairs, and sued-upholstered lounges port and starboard around a forward ‘entertainers’ table.  There’s the comfort aspect readily addressed, with seating for nine in easy reach of the table, or the portside bar module which included sink, hot and cold water and fridge,” Barry Tyler.

“A big improvement to my eyes was the reduction in the number of stainless steel supports and framework that hold up the newly styled hardtop.  As such, the sight lines are unfettered from the flybridge helm over the bow or back down to the cockpit.  Indeed, the 43 would make an excellent gamefishing boat and we’re told one is heading for Tasmania equipped for the purpose.  For family boating, a new wide tread ladder – similar to that on the 47 Enclosed – makes accessing the bridge a breeze, while a new leather-topped dash includes storage space for personal effects and room to accept the latest wide-screen electronics,” David Lockwood.

COCKPIT:

“There are so many standard amenities in the all teak cockpit.  A cabinet below the stairway accommodates a complete fresh and saltwater deck wash system while a sink and fridge box are also accommodated in the stairway base.  Opposite is an aft facing lounge…I particularly liked the well concealed tackle drawers under this lounge.  The transom accommodates as standard, a live bait tank with an optional barbeque unit.  This is made possible by a touch more ingenuity which allows the transom door coaming to fold down rather than up.  There is storage galore in the cockpit with twin removable kill tanks moulded into the deck housing and spacious lockers in the side coamings,” Peter Scott.

“Upon stepping aboard I soon discovered that there were indeed multifarious changes in genre and design thinking and certainly these began as (Riviera’s Stephen) Milne suggested, in what was a demonstrably larger cockpit area.  The boarding platform was the usual convenient and user-friendly ‘visual delight’, complete with telescopic three-rung concealed dive ladder.  The traditional Riviera transom door … had been replaced by a most innovative bridge or top, that hinge-mounted off the actual door itself.  No more ill-fitting, rattling ‘bridges’ with troublesome protruding hinges, this bridge was so simple and innovative in the way it flopped over the top of the transom coamings and ‘locked’ into place – yet so effective in its operation.  A 110% improvement over its predecessor!  Another most obvious change was with the transom area itself, for the traditional, centrally located live-bait tank has been replaced by a well-protected entertainment module that included electric BBQ, sink, rubbish-bin and utensil cupboard.  Fishermen fear not though, with a little improvising and a few dollars more, a suitable live-well can still be fitted alongside this central feature,” Barry Tyler.

“The wonderfully oversized cockpit – deeper than a Riv’ 47 – is something that Australian boaters will embrace.  The aft-facing outdoor lounge on a mezzanine level hard up against the saloon bulkhead is brilliant.  Borrowing from the success of its Sport Yachts with their single level indoor/outdoor entertaining decks, Riviera’s new 43 has a hopper or awning window that swings open to create one big, flowing living area from cockpit to saloon.  Open plan is the mantra – something not often attributed to flybridge cruisers,” David Lockwood.

INTERIOR DESIGN:

“In keeping with the low maintenance and studio styling, the saloon adopts a totally new perspective with a lower level forward galley, amtico rosewood flooring, removable lounge chairs, pop up television and an alfresco window which, when open, draws the large cockpit area and the saloon together as a seamless entertaining and living area.  Riviera certainly haven’t abandoned luxury fitouts – there is an attractive liquor cabinet on entry, complete with a bar fridge/ice maker combo, a supremely comfortable lounge to starboard and an extendable dining table.  The galley is an interesting concept.  While hardly a sunken galley, it is none-the-less, on a lower level which provides for a single angled horizontal benchtop finished in Corian.  Riviera have long been renowned for the quality of their galleys and the 43’s galley is no exception.  Although Riviera has not attempted to provide a three-cabin configuration, the twin cabin, twin bathroom layout and convertible options in the saloon and flybridge mean this 43 footer can easily sleep nine people in comfort,” Peter Scott.

“The very (open-plan) nature of the saloon layout where everything flowed nicely through from cockpit to saloon to galley to accommodation, offered a compelling feeling of spaciousness.  Also contributing very much to this open-plan theme were the impressive Aritex stainless steel saloon doors and alongside these the raise and lower matching hopper window, which allowed easy interaction between the two areas.  Riviera’s team have seemingly made a determined effort to make this a very family-friendly boat,” Barry Tyler.

“Rousing views surround the interior saloon seating headed by a giant C-shaped lounge to starboard that can be optioned as a convertible double bed.  And with a fully loaded galley befitting of a 50-footer sweeping back into the saloon, you can entertain with ease.  There is great attention to detail on the 43, too, with plenty of powerpoints, extractor fans, and natural ventilation.  Fit and finish were five star,” David Lockwood.

 

 

 

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Click to enlarge image: Go Boating - Issue July 2010 review of the new 43 Open Flybridge (cover image courtesy of Go Boating magazine)

Go Boating - Issue July 2010 review of the new 43 Open Flybridge (cover image courtesy of Go Boating magazine)


Pacific Motor Yacht magazine Australia & New Zealand issue March/April 2010 review of the new 43 Open Flybridge (cover image courtesy of Pacific Motor Yacht)

Pacific Motor Yacht magazine Australia & New Zealand issue March/April 2010 review of the new 43 Open Flybridge (cover image courtesy of Pacific Motor Yacht)


Trade A Boat magazine issue July - August 2010 review of the new 43 Open Flybridge (cover image courtesy of Trade A Boat magazine)

Trade A Boat magazine issue July - August 2010 review of the new 43 Open Flybridge (cover image courtesy of Trade A Boat magazine)


The new 43 is practical and perfect for family cruising

The new 43 is practical and perfect for family cruising


Volvo Penta IPS diesel engines give the 43 optimal power and fuel economy

Volvo Penta IPS diesel engines give the 43 optimal power and fuel economy


The flybridge is perfect for entertaining with seating for nine, a dinette, sink and bar amenities

The flybridge is perfect for entertaining with seating for nine, a dinette, sink and bar amenities


Less stainless steel supports gives better vision in the flybridge

Less stainless steel supports gives better vision in the flybridge


The oversized cockpit features an aft facing lounge and optional BBQ

The oversized cockpit features an aft facing lounge and optional BBQ


The open plan saloon with sliding doors gives a feeling of spaciousness

The open plan saloon with sliding doors gives a feeling of spaciousness


The luxurious master stateroom

The luxurious master stateroom


Clever design makes this cabin versatile with sliding centre beds

Clever design makes this cabin versatile with sliding centre beds


The 43 has been described by boating journalists as a breath of fresh air

The 43 has been described by boating journalists as a breath of fresh air


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